Deepika Padukone’s Wedding Saree Designer Dishes Out All The Details Of Her Looks

Ranveer Singh and Deepika Padukone

Mr K. Radharaman

What was the design inspiration behind the two sarees worn by Deepika Padukone?

Deepika was personally present and tried out the sarees before they completed their
selection. As is the case with most high profile weddings, the choice of sarees was a
joint decision by members of the family including Deepika herself. While the design
was not customised for Deepika, it is among the rarest and most exclusive of
designs from “Advaya” the label by K Radharaman for The House of Angadi.
The Gandaberunda is symbolic of Deepika’s home state of Karnataka and is a
mythical two headed Bird. The Gandaberunda is part of Indian legend and folklore
and represents prosperity and wisdom – i.e. material and spiritual wealth. It is a
symbol of royalty and heritage and the fact that Deepika wore it for her wedding
and chose a label from Bangalore is a matter of pride.The saree worn for the reception is an Advaya tissue brocade saree and is a pure zari Kanjeevaram. The body is embellished with a beautiful all over ‘Jaal‘ and the Pallav is closely woven. Both designs are part of the Advaya Heritage Series and are limited edition pieces.

On an average, how long does it take to weave sarees like the ones Deepika wore?

The saree worn for the traditional wedding ceremony that took place in Lake Como
took approximately 45 days and the saree worn at the Bangalore reception took
approximately 60 days to make.

What’s the speciality of a Kanjeevaram saree?

The Kanjeevaram has its own unique design vocabulary, construction and techniques
that distinguish it from other genres. The purchase of a Kanjeevaram used to always
be seen as a family ritual especially for weddings and the knowledge of buying the
right saree was passed on from generation to generation. A Kanjeevaram saree is exemplified by its use of real zari. The characteristic lustre and luxurious drape make the Kanjeevaram saree a statement of luxury and high bearing.

What made you change your career path from being an engineer to being a saree designer?

I never imagined that I would end up working as a designer. I was fortunate that my
father agreed to mentor me and teach me the nuances of design and weaving – he
is an institution by himself, and so I learnt from the master. I guess, I always had it in
my blood and my exposure to the family archives kindled my latent interest in the
subject.